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Brea may refer to:



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Buena Park is the name of places in the United States:



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Costa Mesa, California
City
City of Costa Mesa
An aerial view of Costa Mesa in March 2011.
An aerial view of Costa Mesa in March 2011.
Flag of Costa Mesa, California
Flag
Official seal of Costa Mesa, California
Seal
Motto: “City of the Arts!”
Location of Costa Mesa within Orange County, California
Location of Costa Mesa within Orange County, California
Coordinates: 33°39′54″N 117°54′44″W / 33.66500°N 117.91222°W / 33.66500; -117.91222Coordinates: 33°39′54″N 117°54′44″W / 33.66500°N 117.91222°W / 33.66500; -117.91222
Country  United States of America
State  California
County Orange
Incorporated 1953
Government
 • Type Council-CEO
 • City Council Mayor Jim Righeimer
Stephen Mensinger
Sandra Genis
Gary Monahan
Wendy Leece [1]
 • 
City Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
Tom Hatch
 • 
City Treasurer / Finance Director
Marc Puckett, CCMT
Area[2]
 • Total 15.700 sq mi (40.662 km2)
 • Land 15.654 sq mi (40.543 km2)
 • Water 0.046 sq mi (0.119 km2)  0.29%
Elevation 98 ft (30 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 109,960
 • Rank 8th in Orange County
54th in California
236th in the United States
 • Density 7,000/sq mi (2,700/km2)
Demonym Costa Mesan
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 92626, 92627, 92628
Area code(s) 714/657/949
FIPS code 06-16532
GNIS feature ID 1652692
Website http://www.costamesaca.gov

Costa Mesa is a city in Orange County, California. The population was 109,960 at the 2010 United States Census. Since its incorporation in 1953, the city has grown from a semi-rural farming community of 16,840 to a primarily suburban and edge city with an economy based on retail, commerce, and light manufacturing.

History

Members of the Gabrieleño/Tongva and Juaneño/Luiseño nations long inhabited the area. After the 1769 expedition of Gaspar de Portolà, a Spanish expedition led by Father Junípero Serra named the area Vallejo de Santa Ana (Valley of Saint Anne). On November 1, 1776, Mission San Juan Capistrano became the area’s first permanent European settlement in Alta California, New Spain.

In 1801, the Spanish Empire granted 62,500 acres (253 km2) to Jose Antonio Yorba, which he named Rancho San Antonio. Yorba’s great rancho included the lands where the communities of Olive, Orange, Villa Park, Santa Ana, Tustin, Costa Mesa and Newport Beach stand today.

After the Mexican-American war, California became part of the United States and American settlers arrived in this area and formed the town of Fairview in the 1880s near the modern intersection of Harbor Boulevard and Adams Avenue. An 1889 flood wiped out the railroad serving the community, however, and it shriveled.

To the south, meanwhile, the community of Harper had arisen on a siding of the Santa Ana and Newport Railroad, named after a local rancher. This town prospered on its agricultural goods. On May 11, 1920, Harper changed its name to Costa Mesa, which literally means “coast table(land)” in Spanish. This is a reference to the city’s geography as being a plateau by the coast.

Costa Mesa surged in population during and after World War II, as many thousands trained at Santa Ana Army Air Base and returned after the war with their families. Within three decades of incorporation, the city’s population had nearly quintupled.

Commerce and culture

Costa Mesa’s local economy relies heavily on retail and services. The single largest center of commercial activity is South Coast Plaza, a shopping center noted for its architecture and size. The volume of sales generated by South Coast Plaza, on the strength of 322 stores, places it among the highest volume regional shopping centers in the nation. It generates more than one billion dollars per year. Some manufacturing activity also takes place in the city, mostly in the industrial, southwestern quarter, which is home to a number of electronics, pharmaceuticals and plastics firms. Business services company Experian is the largest employer in the city and has their North American Headquarters in Costa Mesa.

The commercial district surrounding South Coast Plaza, which contains parts of northern Costa Mesa and southern Santa Ana, is sometimes called South Coast Metro.

The Segerstrom Center for the Arts and South Coast Repertory Theater are based in the city. A local newspaper, the Daily Pilot, is owned, operated, and printed by the Los Angeles Times. Ceradyne, El Pollo Loco, Emulex, Hurley, RVCA, L-R-G, the Trinity Broadcasting Network, and Volcom are among the businesses headquartered in Costa Mesa.

The Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts.

Newport Boulevard, 1950s

Costa Mesa offers 26 parks, a municipal golf course, 26 public schools and 2 libraries. It is also home to the Orange County Fairgrounds, which hosts one of the largest fairs in California, the Orange County Fair, each July. The Fair receives more than one million visitors each year. Adjacent to the Fairgrounds is the Pacific Amphitheatre, which has hosted acts such as Madonna, Bill Cosby, Jessica Simpson, Steppenwolf, Kelly Clarkson and many more.

Top employers

According to the City’s 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[3] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of employees
1 Experian 3,700
2 Coast Community College District Foundation 2,900
3 Orange Coast College 2,500
4 Coast Community College District 2,500
5 Fairview Developmental Center 1,500
6 Automobile Club of Southern California 1,200
7 First Team Real Estate 1,025
8 Pacific Building Care 850
9 IBM 750
10 FileNet 600
11 Hyundai Motor America 20,000

Government

Local

A general law city, Costa Mesa has a council-manager form of government. Voters elect a five-member City Council, all at-large seats, who in turn select a mayor who acts as its chairperson and head of the government. Day to day, the city is run by a professional city manager and staff of approximately 600 full-time employees.

Management of the city and coordination of city services are provided by:[4]

Office Officeholder
City CEO Thomas R. Hatch
City Assistant CEO Richard Francis
City Attorney Thomas Duarte
Director of Administrative Services Steven N. Mandoki
Director of Development Services Donald D. Lamm
Director of Finance Vacant
Director of Public Works Ernesto Munoz
Fire Chief (vacant)
Police Chief Tom Gaszi

Civic Center

The 9.5 acre (38,000 m²) Costa Mesa Civic Center is located at 77 Fair Drive. City Hall is a five-story building where the primary administrative functions of the City are conducted. Also contained in the Civic Center complex are Council Chambers, the Police facility, Communications building and Fire Station No. 5.

Emergency services

Fire protection is provided by the Costa Mesa Fire Department. Law enforcement is the responsibility of the Costa Mesa Police Department. Emergency Medical Services are provided by the Costa Mesa Fire Department and Care Ambulance Service.

State and federal

In the state legislature Costa Mesa is located in the 35th Senate District, represented by Republican Tom Harman, and in the 68th Assembly District, represented by Republican Allan Mansoor. Federally, Costa Mesa is located in California’s 46th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +6[5] and is represented by Republican Dana Rohrabacher.

Transportation

Costa Mesa is served by several bus lines of the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), but most transportation is by automobile. Two freeways terminate here, State Route 73 and State Route 55 (also known as the Costa Mesa Freeway). The San Diego Freeway, Interstate 405, also runs through the city.

Geography

Costa Mesa is located 37 miles (60 km) southeast of Los Angeles, 88 miles (142 km) north of San Diego and 425 miles (684 km) south of San Francisco, Costa Mesa encompasses a total of 16 square miles (41 km2) with its southernmost border only 1-mile (1.6 km) from the Pacific Ocean. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.7 square miles (41 km2). 15.7 square miles (41 km2) of it is land and 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2) of it (0.29%) is water.

Climate

Costa Mesa has a Mediterranean climate with mild temperatures year round. Rain falls primarily in the winter months, and is close to nonexistent during the summer. Morning low clouds and fog are common due to its coastal location. (Köppen climate classification Csa).

Climate data for Costa Mesa, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 63
(17)
63
(17)
63
(17)
64
(18)
66
(19)
68
(20)
71
(22)
72
(22)
72
(22)
70
(21)
67
(19)
63
(17)
67
(19)
Average low °F (°C) 50
(10)
51
(11)
52
(11)
55
(13)
58
(14)
61
(16)
64
(18)
65
(18)
64
(18)
60
(16)
54
(12)
49
(9)
59
(15)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.07
(52.6)
2.68
(68.1)
1.67
(42.4)
.72
(18.3)
.13
(3.3)
.07
(1.8)
.02
(0.5)
.02
(0.5)
.17
(4.3)
.38
(9.7)
.96
(24.4)
1.82
(46.2)
10.71
(272)
Source: Weather Channel [6]

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[7] reported that Costa Mesa had a population of 109,960. The population density was 7,004.0 people per square mile (2,704.3/km²). The racial makeup of Costa Mesa was 75,335 (68.5%) White (51.8% Non-Hispanic White),[8] 1,640 (1.5%) African American, 686 (0.6%) Native American, 8,654 (7.9%) Asian, 527 (0.5%) Pacific Islander, 17,992 (16.4%) from other races, and 5,126 (4.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 39,403 persons (35.8%).

The Census reported that 106,990 people (97.3% of the population) lived in households, 2,232 (2.0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 738 (0.7%) were institutionalized.

There were 39,946 households, out of which 12,298 (30.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 16,478 (41.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 4,369 (10.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 2,392 (6.0%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 3,013 (7.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 281 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 10,963 households (27.4%) were made up of individuals and 2,775 (6.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68. There were 23,239 families (58.2% of all households); the average family size was 3.30.

The population was spread out with 23,682 people (21.5%) under the age of 18, 12,847 people (11.7%) aged 18 to 24, 38,211 people (34.7%) aged 25 to 44, 25,106 people (22.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 10,114 people (9.2%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.6 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.7 males.

There were 42,120 housing units at an average density of 2,682.9 per square mile (1,035.9/km²), of which 15,799 (39.6%) were owner-occupied, and 24,147 (60.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.2%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.9%. 42,517 people (38.7% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 64,473 people (58.6%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Costa Mesa had a median household income of $65,373, with 14.1% of the population living below the poverty line. [9]

2000

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 108,724 people, 39,206 households, and 22,778 families resiwith them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.9% were non-families. 28.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 11.2% from 18 to 24, 39.0% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 105.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,732, and the median income for a family was $55,456. Males had a median income of $38,670 versus $32,365 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,342. About 8.2% of families and 12.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Institutions of higher learning located in Costa Mesa include Orange Coast College, Vanguard University (affiliated with the Assemblies of God), Whittier Law School (a satellite of Whittier College) and National University (a private university based in La Jolla, California).

Costa Mesa has two high schools, Costa Mesa High School and Estancia High School. Costa Mesa has two public middle schools; Tewinkle Middle School, which was named after Costa Mesa’s first mayor, and Costa Mesa Middle School which shares the same campus as Costa Mesa High School. Costa Mesa also has two alternative high schools that share the same campus, Back Bay High School and Monte Vista High School and another, Coastline Early College High School which is on its own facility. Olympic high jumper, Sharon Day, graduated from Costa Mesa High School in 2003.[11]

Sister city

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ “City of Costa Mesa, California”. Ci.costa-mesa.ca.us. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  2. ^ U.S. Census
  3. ^ City of Costa Mesa CAFR
  4. ^ City of Costa Mesa Website retrieved 2009-06-04
  5. ^ “Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?”. Campaign Legal Center Blog. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  6. ^ Average weather for Costa Mesa Weather Channel Retrieved 2013-10-21
  7. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  8. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0616532.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0616532.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ “USA Track & Field – Sharon Day”. Usatf.org. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  12. ^ [1][dead link]
  13. ^ Kwiatkowski, Elizabeth (August 19, 2013). Whodunnit?’ Crowns Kam Perez Winner and Unveils Cris Crotz as Killer”. Reality TV World. 
  14. ^ Aimee Berg (2008-07-24). “The Perfect Mismatch”. U.S. Olympic Committee web site. Retrieved 2008-07-24. 

External links



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Costa Mesa, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Capistrano Beach
District of Dana Point
Capistrano Beach
Capistrano Beach
Country United States
State California
County Orange
City Dana Point
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 92624
Area code(s) 949

Capistrano Beach, also known as Capo Beach, is part of the city of Dana Point in Orange County, California.[1] It is bordered by San Clemente to the south and Doheny State Beach to the north. Capistrano Beach is one of the few remaining “beach towns” in Orange County. It has avoided much of the commercialization of the surrounding areas, and remains a unique and charming place with a “small town” atmosphere.

Capistrano Beach Dana Point California

Capistrano Beach is situated along the coast on the southern end of Dana Point. Homes range from beach cottages to some of the finest real estate in Orange County. Many multi-million dollar homes can be found in the area, with some situated atop a cliff overlooking Coast Highway and the Capistrano Beach park below. Several celebrities live in the town area, notably on Beach Road. There are more modest homes in Capistrano Beach, namely older homes located off Camino Capistrano a little farther from the shore.

References

External links

Coordinates: 33°27′49″N 117°40′42″W / 33.463611°N 117.678333°W / 33.463611; -117.678333



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Capistrano Beach, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Not to be confused with Cyprus.
For other uses, see Cypress (disambiguation).

Monterey Cypresses (Cupressus macrocarpa) planted in Melbourne, Australia

Cypress is the name applied to many plants in the cypress family Cupressaceae, which is a conifer of northern temperate regions. Most cypress species are trees, while a few are shrubs.

Cupressus sempervirens is famous for its longevity, and has been a popular garden plant for thousands of years.

The word cypress is derived from Old French cipres, which was imported from Latin cypressus the latinisation of the Greek κυπάρισσος (kyparissos).[1][2]

The Cupressaceae family also contains 13–16 other genera (not listed above) that do not bear cypress in their common names.

The word cypress is also used as a descriptor for the angiosperm vine in the bindweed family Convolvulaceae, known as the cypress vine (Ipomoea quamoclit).

The plant called “summer cypress” is Bassia scoparia (Amaranthaceae).

See also

References

  1. ^ κυπάρισσος, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, on Perseus Digital Library
  2. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cypress



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Cypress, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Cowan Heights
Neighbourhood
Country  Canada
Province  Newfoundland and Labrador
City St. John’s
Ward 3
Government
 • Administrative body St. John’s City Council
 • Councilor Bruce Tilley

Cowan Heights is a west end neighbourhood in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. Canada Drive and Frecker Drive are the two main road-ways that run through most of the neighborhood.

Schools

Cowan Heights has two schools. They are St. Matthews Elementary (115 Cowan Avenue) and Cowan Heights Elementary (100 Canada Drive). Though their addresses are on different streets, the schools are directly across from each other.

Streets

Some streets of Cowan Heights are:

  • Bancroft Place
  • Bellevue Crescent
  • Birmingham Street
  • Burin Street
  • Burling Crescent
  • Brigus Place
  • Canada Drive
  • Cape Broyle Place
  • Cherrington Street
  • Codroy Place
  • Cowan Avenue
  • Creston Place
  • Duntara Crescent
  • Ferryland Street (East and West)
  • Frecker Drive
  • Gander Crescent
  • Gillingham Place
  • Gladney Street
  • Grant Place
  • Greenspond Drive
  • Harrington Drive
  • Hopeall Street
  • Lodge Place
  • Newman Street
  • Organ Place
  • Point Lemington Street
  • Point Verde Place
  • Roddickton Place
  • Tanner Street
  • Trinity Street
  • Torngat Crescent
  • Wabush Place

See also

References

External links



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article cowan heights, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Coto de Caza
census-designated place
Location of Coto de Caza within Orange County, California.
Location of Coto de Caza within Orange County, California.
Coordinates: 33°35′45″N 117°35′16″W / 33.59583°N 117.58778°W / 33.59583; -117.58778Coordinates: 33°35′45″N 117°35′16″W / 33.59583°N 117.58778°W / 33.59583; -117.58778
Country  United States
State  California
County Orange
Area[1]
 • Total 7.974 sq mi (20.653 km2)
 • Land 7.951 sq mi (20.593 km2)
 • Water 0.023 sq mi (0.061 km2)  0.29%
Elevation 709 ft (216 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 14,866
 • Density 1,900/sq mi (720/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 92679
Area code(s) 949
FIPS code 06-16580
GNIS feature ID 1867008

Coto de Caza (meaning game preserve[2] in Spanish) is a census-designated place (CDP) and guard-gated private community in Orange County, California. The population was 14,866 at the 2010 census.

The CDP is a suburban planned community of about 4,000 homes and one of Orange County’s oldest and most expensive master-planned communities. The project began in 1968, when it was envisioned as a hunting lodge, now the Lodge at Coto de Caza, and the community was completed in 2003. Around the town, there are still undeveloped lots available for purchase.[citation needed] The majority of the community is tract housing, with collections of custom-built homes on the outskirts off the main streets.[citation needed]

Clubs, sports and recreation

Currently, there are two 18-hole golf courses and two clubhouses, one considered the “old club” and the other the “new club”. The new club, the Coto De Caza Golf & Racquet Club, harbors the facilities of the two golf courses and adjacent ten tennis courts. The old club, located in the residential area known as “the Village”, was once home to tennis guru and teacher Vic Braden; it was also the home location for the Coto de Caza Youth Swim Team. The new club finished construction of the new Spa & Sports Club building in April 2008 that houses a new fitness center with state-of-the-art StarTrac exercise equipment, a spa with many services, a snack bar with Starbuck’s coffee, and the Michael Chang Tennis Hall of Fame and Member Lounge. The golf courses are both Robert Trent Jones Jr. design. The North course was rated the most difficult golf course in all of Orange County.

The Thomas F. Riley Wilderness Park

The Thomas F. Riley Wilderness Park, which is open to the general public except after rain, surrounds the community of Coto de Caza on its eastern, northern, and southern borders. The park is a Wildlife and Plant Sanctuary and is known for its biological diversity. It is known for its oak groves, sycamores, and two creeks. The park is home to mountain lions, that have been known to attack without warning. Nearly 500 acres (2.0 km2) in size, it features approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) of equestrian, hiking, and biking trails. Its nature center houses an educational center for outdoor education for local schools and community groups. It also serves as an ecological preserve for the native endangered plant and animal species. The park is maintained and paid for by Orange County Parks, and is administered by Park Rangers and maintenance staff.

Commerce

Coto de Caza contains commercial endeavors: the Lodge at Coto de Caza, the Coto de Caza Golf and Racquet Club, and the Coto de Caza General Store. Residents shop in Rancho Santa Margarita, Mission Viejo, Las Flores, or Ladera Ranch.

Geography

Coto de Caza is located in the northern portion of Wagon Wheel Canyon in southeast Orange County, at 33°35′45″N 117°35′16″W / 33.59583°N 117.58778°W / 33.59583; -117.58778 (33.595925, -117.587665).[3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.0 square miles (21 km2), of which, 8.0 square miles (21 km2) of it is land and 0.02 square miles (0.052 km2) of it (0.29%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 2,853
2000 13,057 357.7%
2010 14,866 13.9%
source:[4]

2010

The 2010 United States Census[5] reported that Coto de Caza had a population of 14,866. The population density was 1,864.2 people per square mile (719.8/km²). The racial makeup of Coto de Caza was 13,094 (88.1%) White (82.2% Non-Hispanic White),[6] 132 (0.9%) African American, 26 (0.2%) Native American, 878 (5.9%) Asian, 20 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 174 (1.2%) from other races, and 542 (3.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,170 persons (7.9%).

The Census reported that 14,866 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 4,736 households, out of which 2,407 (50.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 3,763 (79.5%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 294 (6.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 133 (2.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 96 (2.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 30 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 420 households (8.9%) were made up of individuals and 116 (2.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.14. There were 4,190 families (88.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.35.

The population was spread out with 4,545 people (30.6%) under the age of 18, 996 people (6.7%) aged 18 to 24, 2,706 people (18.2%) aged 25 to 44, 5,452 people (36.7%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,167 people (7.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.2 years. For every 100 females there were 96.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

There were 4,853 housing units at an average density of 608.6 per square mile (235.0/km²), of which 4,341 (91.7%) were owner-occupied, and 395 (8.3%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.0%; the rental vacancy rate was 1.5%. 13,738 people (92.4% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 1,128 people (7.6%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Coto de Caza had a median household income of $169,176, with 2.0% of the population living below the federal poverty line. [7]

2000

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 13,057 people, 4,049 households, and 3,644 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,654.5 inhabitants per square mile (639.0/km²). There were 4,152 housing units at an average density of 526.1 per square mile (203.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 89.36% White, 0.74% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 5.16% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 1.65% from other races, and 2.80% from two or more races. 6.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,049 households out of which 56.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.4% were married couples living together, 4.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.0% were non-families. 7.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.22 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 35.1% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 3.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.4 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $136,726, and the median income for a family was $141,598. Males had a median income of $97,803 versus $50,689 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $55,900. About 0.7% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Education

Most students in Coto de Caza reside in the Capistrano Unified School District and attend Tijeras Creek Elementary, Wagon Wheel Elementary, Las Flores Middle School, Tesoro High School, and Santa Margarita Catholic High School (located at the North Gate and not part of Capistrano Unified).[9] St. John’s Episcopal School and Serra Catholic Schools are private elementary and middle schools located outside the gates.

The residents rebuffed an attempt to build a 400-student public school within the walls of the community.[9] They had concerns that it would “undermine the privacy and security” of the enclave, that it would be “downright illegal [to place a public school on a gated private property]“, that it would force admission of large numbers of non-residents to the community, and that an eventual lawsuit would force the removal of the gates.[9] The reason for proposal was that Wagon Wheel Elementary School, which is located immediately outside the community gates, had far more students than planned.[9] The school equipment was to consist of 20 portable buildings which would have simply been added to Wagon Wheel if the new school’s construction could not be completed.[9] Had it been built, it would have become the first public school to be built inside the limits of a gated community.[9]

Politics and government

In the state legislature Coto de Caza is located in the 33rd Senate District, represented by Republican Mimi Walters, and in the 71st Assembly District, represented by Republican Jeff Miller. Federally, Coto de Caza is located in California’s 44th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +6[10] and is represented by Republican Ken Calvert.

Coto de Caza gave more than 65 percent support to Proposition 8 in 2008.[11]

The area is patrolled by the California Highway Patrol, Orange County Sheriff’s Department, and the Coto de Caza security force.

In popular culture

For the 1984 Summer Olympics, the community served as host to the riding, running, shooting, and fencing portions of the modern pentathlon events.[12]

The community is the setting of the reality-based television show The Real Housewives of Orange County on Bravo.

Notable natives and residents

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ While some residents believe that Coto de Caza means “Preserve of the Hunt” in Portuguese, this is erroneous. Actually, Coto de Caza is Spanish for “Hunt Reserve” and implies that the reserve is private.[citation needed]
  3. ^ “US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990″. United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ “CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING (1790-2000)”. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2010-07-17. 
  5. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  6. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0616580.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0616580.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Linn Groves, Liz Seymour, Tina Nguyen (1998-12-14). “Public School Plan Rattles Coto de Caza Residents”. Los Angeles Times. 
  10. ^ “Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?”. Campaign Legal Center Blog. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  11. ^ http://www.eccopac.org/2008/11/orange-county-says-yes-on-prop-8.html
  12. ^ 1984 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 140-3.
  13. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5293/is_20080804/ai_n28118548/.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  14. ^ Steamlocomotive.info
  15. ^ Orange County Register – Steam locomotive runs around Coto de Caza home
  16. ^ Orange County Register – Coto de Caza’s Real Steam Railroad

External links



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Coto De Caza, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Not to be confused with Santa Margarita, California, a city in San Luis Obispo County.
City of Rancho Santa Margarita
City
Rancho Santa Margarita
Rancho Santa Margarita
Flag of City of Rancho Santa Margarita
Flag
Official seal of City of Rancho Santa Margarita
Seal
Location of Rancho Santa Margarita within Orange County, California.
Location of Rancho Santa Margarita within Orange County, California.
Coordinates: 33°38′29″N 117°35′40″W / 33.64139°N 117.59444°W / 33.64139; -117.59444Coordinates: 33°38′29″N 117°35′40″W / 33.64139°N 117.59444°W / 33.64139; -117.59444
Country  United States
State  California
County Orange
Incorporated January 1, 2000
Government
 • Mayor Carol Gamble
Area[1]
 • Total 12.992 sq mi (33.651 km2)
 • Land 12.957 sq mi (33.560 km2)
 • Water 0.035 sq mi (0.091 km2)  0.27%
Elevation 551-1,000 ft (290 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 47,853
 • Density 3,700/sq mi (1,400/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 92688, 92679
Area code(s) 949
FIPS code 06-59587
GNIS feature ID 1867054
Website http://www.cityofrsm.org/

Rancho Santa Margarita is an affluent city in Orange County, California. One of Orange County’s youngest cities, Rancho Santa Margarita is a master planned community set upon rolling hills. Most neighborhoods in Rancho Santa Margarita are within various homeowners associations. The population was 47,853 at the 2010 census, up from 47,214 at the 2000 census.

Although it is named for Rancho Santa Margarita y Las Flores, which was in San Diego County, the city limits fall within the borders of Rancho Mission Viejo.

History

The city seal has the brands of Rancho Mission Viejo and Rancho Santa Margarita and Las Flores on the border, with artwork containing Santiago Peak in the background. The tower in the foreground symbolizes the Rancho Santa Margarita Lake Tower.

Hughes Aircraft Company’s Microelectronic Systems Division moved to Rancho Santa Margarita in May 1988 from Irvine. In August 1992 the Hughes plant closed its facilities and moved the division to Carlsbad, California due to budget constraints in the aerospace industry.

La Cañada Flintridge had the longest city name in California with 18 letters until January 1, 2000, when the title was ceded to Rancho Santa Margarita (20 letters) upon the latter’s incorporation.

Where schools, shopping centers and residential neighborhoods now stand, Native Americans once lived. On July 23, 1769, they were visited by a Spanish expedition under Captain Gaspar de Portola, who camped near the site of Tijeras Creek Golf Course in Rancho Santa Margarita.

On July 24, the expedition headed inland to avoid the many streams and swamps in the area. They found a large plateau area and camped that night on its western edge by a canyon, which the Franciscans named San Francisco Solano. This was on the eastern side of Trabuco Creek about three miles downstream from the present site of Trabuco Oaks.

While camped here on July 24–25, one of the soldiers lost his trabuco, or musket, a most valuable possession to any soldier. To mark this loss, the stream was named Trabuco. The name has been associated with the mesa, the canyon, and the entire area ever since. The Spaniards founded Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1776, and ruled the region until 1821, when California became part of Mexico.

The Mexican governors carved the area around the mission into three large ranchos: Rancho Trabuco, Rancho Mission Viejo, and Rancho Santa Margarita. James L. Flood and his partner Jerome O’Neill purchased the combined ranchos in 1882. The huge estate was run as a working ranch into the 1920s. In 1940, the ranch was divided, with the Flood family taking the lower portion, in today’s San Diego County, with the upper portion retained by the O’Neill family. In 1942, the Navy annexed the Flood family’s portion of the ranch for use as Camp Joseph H. Pendleton.

In 1948, the O’Neill family donated 278 acres of canyon bottom land to the County of Orange for park purposes. The O’Neill family donated an additional 120 acres of parkland in 1963, the same year they founded the Mission Viejo Company and drew up plans for a master-planned community of the same name.

By the 1960s, a rural cluster of homes had been present in Trabuco Canyon for decades. The area’s first tract developed homes didn’t arrive until late in the decade in what would become Coto de Caza, which started out as a hunting and fishing resort. The area remained fairly remote until 1986, when the first homes in the new master planned community of Rancho Santa Margarita were sold. The economic boom of the 1980s also fueled home construction in nearby Dove Canyon, Robinson Ranch, Wagon Wheel and a handful of smaller developments. The area became better linked to the rest of the county in 1992, when extensions of Oso, Antonio and Alicia Parkways were completed.

In 1989, the people of the community of Rancho Santa Margarita established a Community Civic Association (CCA) for the purpose of providing a political voice for the community. The CCA, later known as the Rancho Margarita Civic Association (and still later as the Civic Council), briefly explored self-governance, but it was in 1995 that the RSM Cityhood Committee, a separate community organization, began the official drive for cityhood. Rancho Santa Margarita was planned to be an “Urban Village”, offering the best of two worlds: all of the elements and advantages of a small city plus the quality of life of a small village.

In November 1999, area voters opted to incorporate the Rancho Santa Margarita Planned Community and the neighboring Robinson Ranch, Dove Canyon, Rancho Cielo, Trabuco Highlands and Walden Communities. The newly formed City of Rancho Santa Margarita incorporated on January 1, 2000, and became the 33rd city in the County of Orange.

The City is a general law city and operates under the council-manager form of government. Rancho Santa Margarita is a contract city. Police services are provided through contract with the Orange County Sheriff. Fire Protection services are provided through the Orange County Fire Authority.

Geography

Rancho Santa Margarita is located at 33°38′29″N 117°35′40″W / 33.64139°N 117.59444°W / 33.64139; -117.59444 (33.641518, -117.594524).[2] It occupies much of a high plateau known as Plano Trabuco.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.0 square miles (34 km2). 13.0 square miles (34 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) of it (0.27%) is water.

Rancho Santa Margarita is bordered by the city of Mission Viejo on the west, the census-designated Coto de Caza and Las Flores on the south, Trabuco Canyon on the north, and the Cleveland National Forest on the east.

Major homeowner’s associations and communities

The Rancho Santa Margarita City Hall and Community Center building

SAMLARC

The Rancho Santa Margarita Landscape and Recreation Corporation, or SAMLARC, is often referred to as the master association in Rancho Santa Margarita because other smaller sub associations fall within its membership and it encompasses the original footprint of the master planned community of Rancho Santa Margarita. SAMLARC comprises roughly 13,000 units and maintains most streetscapes, medians, parks and trails within the community. In total, SAMLARC runs and maintains 13 parks, 4 pools, a lagoon, a lake, and numerous trails within the community. One of SAMLARC’s most popular parks, Central Park located next to City Hall, contains a large amphitheater where a number of community events are held each year. Central Park is also home to an arena soccer rink that was converted from a roller hockey rink. SAMLARC also maintains a popular skate and dog park that are located within SAMLARC’s Canada Vista Park.[3]

Dove Canyon

Dove Canyon is a private residential community located in eastern Rancho Santa Margarita. It is a small enclave of approximately 1,200 homes and 5,000 residents. Included within the guard-gated entry is a Jack Nicklaus signature golf club, pool, tennis courts, a small child’s park, a wide field, a shopping center (just outside the entry), and a reservoir. The majority of its residents are upper middle class residents of Orange County, and all of the homes in Dove Canyon are single-family residences. It is located in the Southeasternmost foothills of Orange County. Major roads include Dove Canyon/Bell Canyon and Sycamore Canyon. A horse trail starts at the waterfalls outside of the community and continues until the end of Sycamore Canyon. From there, hikers, horse riders, bikers, etc. can continue into Dove Canyon’s neighbor community, Coto de Caza.

Robinson Ranch

Robinson Ranch is a mid-sized residential community located northeastern Rancho Santa Margarita south of Trabuco Canyon. It is one of the older communities in Rancho Santa Margarita. It has several condominium areas closer to Plano Trabuco Road and two large parks. Major Roads include Robinson Ranch and Shadow Rock. Like Dove Canyon and Rancho Cielo it is assigned with a Trabuco Canyon zip code even though the areas were annexed into Rancho Santa Margarita when the city incorporated in 2000. The street at the bottom of the hill is the entrance into O’Neil National Park.

Rancho Cielo

Rancho Cielo is a smaller residential community located in eastern Rancho Santa Margarita. It includes gated entry with security guard. It is near the intersection of Plano Trabuco Road and Dove Canyon Drive. All of the homes are all single family residences and the majority of its residents are upper-middle class. Major Roads include Rancho Cielo and Camino Del Cielo.

Climate

Rancho Santa Margarita, like most of coastal Southern California, generally has a Mediterranean climate. The name derives from its similarity to the climate of areas along the Mediterranean Sea. Summers are warm to hot, and winters are cool, rarely falling below freezing. Precipitation in Rancho Santa Margarita occurs predominantly during the winter months. The average January temperature in Rancho Santa Margarita is 56 °F (13 °C), while the average August temperature is 73 °F (23 °C).

Economy

Top employers

According to the City’s 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[4] the top 11 employers in the city are:

# Employer # of employees
1 Applied Medical 2500 (est)ǂ
2 Cox Communications 1,200
3 O’Connell Landscape Maintenance 980
4 Saddleback Valley Unified School District 606
5 Lucas & Mercier Construction 553
6 Control Components Inc. 370
7 Target 247
8 Car Sound Exhaust System 207
9 Capistrano Unified School District 210
10 Santa Margarita Catholic High School 200
11 Professional Association of Diving Instructors 200

ǂ As of June 2012

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 11,390
2000 47,214 314.5%
2010 47,853 1.4%
source:[5][6]

Antonio Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita

Avenida De Las Banderas in Rancho Santa Margarita

2010

The 2010 United States Census[7] reported that Rancho Santa Margarita had a population of 47,853. The population density was 3,683.1 people per square mile (1,422.0/km²). The racial makeup of Rancho Santa Margarita was 37,421 (78.2%) White (67.0% Non-Hispanic White),[8] 887 (1.9%) African American, 182 (0.4%) Native American, 4,350 (9.1%) Asian, 102 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 2,674 (5.6%) from other races, and 2,237 (4.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8,902 persons (18.6%).

The Census reported that 47,851 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 2 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 16,665 households, out of which 7,699 (46.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 10,144 (60.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,703 (10.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 700 (4.2%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 747 (4.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 103 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 3,199 households (19.2%) were made up of individuals and 761 (4.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87. There were 12,547 families (75.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.33.

The population was spread out with 13,879 people (29.0%) under the age of 18, 3,793 people (7.9%) aged 18 to 24, 13,706 people (28.6%) aged 25 to 44, 13,764 people (28.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 2,711 people (5.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.

There were 17,260 housing units at an average density of 1,328.4 per square mile (512.9/km²), of which 11,906 (71.4%) were owner-occupied, and 4,759 (28.6%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.2%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.6%. 35,737 people (74.7% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 12,114 people (25.3%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Rancho Santa Margarita had a median household income of $102,975, with 3.9% of the population living below the federal poverty line. [9]

2000

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 47,214 people, 16,253 households, and 12,417 families residing within the city. The population density was 3,847.6 inhabitants per square mile (1,485.7/km²). There were 16,515 housing units at an average density of 1,345.9 per square mile (519.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 81.59% White, 1.75% African American, 0.42% Native American, 7.40% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 4.49% from other races, and 4.15% from two or more races. Hispanic of any race were 13.00% of the population.

There were 16,253 households out of which 51.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 17.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the city the population was spread out with 33.6% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 41.4% from 25 to 44, 15.9% from 45 to 64, and 3.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 96.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.9 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $95,061, and the median income for a family was $110,799.[11] Males had a median income of $61,314 versus $40,799 for females. The per capita income for the city was $31,531. About 1.5% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over. Most of the neighborhoods in RSM are maintained by larger homeowner’s associations including Melinda Heights, town center, Dove Canyon, Rancho Cielo, Robinson Ranch, and Trabuco Highlands. Dove Canyon, Trabuco Highlands, Robinson Ranch, and Rancho Cielo were all established before Rancho Santa Margarita was an incorporated community. East of Plano Tabuco Road is designated with a Trabuco Canyon (92679) zip code even though the area falls within the City of Rancho Santa Margarita boundary.[12]

Education

The city is served by Saddleback Valley Unified School District and the Capistrano Unified School District.

  • Students in SVUSD boundaries attend Trabuco Hills High School or Mission Viejo High School, both outside of Rancho Santa Margarita in the city of Mission Viejo. Students in CUSD boundaries attend Tesoro High School located in the Las Flores neighborhood.
  • RSM Intermediate School (SVUSD) and Las Flores Middle School (CUSD) serve the city.
  • Public Elementary schools include Cielo Vista, Trabuco Mesa, Robinson Ranch, Arroyo Vista, Melinda Heights, and Tijeras Creek.
  • Private Elementary and Middle Schools include St. John’s Episcopal, Serra Catholic, and Mission Hills Christian School.
  • Santa Margarita Catholic High School is a private Roman Catholic high school associated with the Catholic Diocese of Orange, and headed by Principal Ray Dunne. SMCHS is located in Rancho Santa Margarita.

Popular culture

Television

The television series The Real Housewives of Orange County, although based in Coto De Caza, is mainly filmed in Rancho Santa Margarita where many of the housewives do business, shopping, commuting, and dining.[13]

The city’s name often creates confusion: people in the Las Flores, Dove Canyon, Rancho Cielo, or Robinson Ranch neighborhoods, for example, can receive mail addressed to them at Rancho Santa Margarita, Dove Canyon, Coto de Caza, Robinson Ranch or Trabuco Canyon.

A map of Orange County seen in season four of Arrested Development places the fictional Bluth Company-developed community of Sudden Valley northeast of Mission Viejo and Las Flores, in the approximate location of Rancho Santa Margarita.

Notable natives and residents

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ “US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990″. United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ Official SAMLARC Website
  4. ^ City of Rancho Santa Margarita CAFR
  5. ^ “CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING (1790-2000)”. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2010-07-17. 
  6. ^ 1990 census figure was taken prior to incorporation as Rancho Santa Margarita CDP.
  7. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  8. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0659587.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0659587.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ Fact Finder
  12. ^ City Zoning Map
  13. ^ BRAVOtv.com: The Real Housewives of Orange County: Season 3 (Home)
  14. ^ Perkes, Courtney (2008-07-23). “Ex-Olympian battles rheumatoid arthritis”. The Orange County Register. pp. Life, etc. 2. 
  15. ^ http://struggleskateboards.com/rubennajera.htm

External links



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Dove Canyon, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

City of Dana Point
City
Aerial view of Dana Point
Aerial view of Dana Point
Official seal of City of Dana Point
Seal
Motto: “Harboring the Good Life”
Location of Dana Point within Orange County, California.
Location of Dana Point within Orange County, California.
Coordinates: 33°28′2″N 117°41′53″W / 33.46722°N 117.69806°W / 33.46722; -117.69806Coordinates: 33°28′2″N 117°41′53″W / 33.46722°N 117.69806°W / 33.46722; -117.69806
Country USA
State  California
County Orange
Incorporated January 1, 1989[1]
Government
 • Mayor Steven H. Weinberg[2]
Area[3]
 • Total 29.484 sq mi (76.364 km2)
 • Land 6.497 sq mi (16.828 km2)
 • Water 22.987 sq mi (59.536 km2)  77.96%
Elevation 144 ft (44 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 33,351
 • Density 1,100/sq mi (440/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 92624, 92629
Area code(s) 949
FIPS code 06-17946
GNIS feature ID 1656474
Website http://www.danapoint.org/
Reference No. 189[4]

Dana Point is a city located in southern Orange County, California. The population was 33,351 at the 2010 census. It has one of the few harbors along the Orange County coast, and with ready access via State Route 1, it is a popular local destination for surfing.

The city was named after the headland of Dana Point, which was in turn named after Richard Henry Dana, Jr., author of Two Years Before the Mast, which included a description of the area. Dana described the locale, including neighboring San Juan Capistrano, as “the only romantic spot on the coast”.[5] Although Dana described the anchorage as poor, it is now a developed harbor and contains a replica of his ship, the Pilgrim. The Pilgrim is used as a classroom by the Ocean Institute, which is located at the harbor. This area is designated California Historical Landmark #189.[4]

History

The Headland of Dana Point, California

Dana Point

Dana Point was a popular port for ships involved with the hide trade with nearby Mission San Juan Capistrano, with trading reaching its peak in the 1830s and 1840s. In 1818, Argentine sailor Hippolyte de Bouchard anchored here while conducting his raid on the mission. Richard Henry Dana then visited the area in 1835 while serving aboard the sailing brig Pilgrim on their voyage along the California coastline.[4]

In 1923, Los Angeles Times publisher Harry Chandler and General M.H. Sherman, director of the Pacific Electric Railway Company, created a major real estate group to develop what is known today as the Hollywood Hills. Sidney H. Woodruff, already a prominent Los Angeles homebuilder, was hired to lead the project. In 1926, Woodruff, Chandler and Sherman created the Dana Point Syndicate. They invited other heavy hitters, company presidents, movie producers and real estate investors to join them in purchasing 1,388 acres (5.6 km2) of land, some of which includes the “Headlands” of today. Promising tree-lined and paved streets, electricity, telephones, sidewalks, water mains, storm drains, sewers and other amenities, Woodruff built 35 homes and a number of commercial buildings.

Most of these “Woodruff” houses are concentrated in a Dana Point’s historic core, also called Lantern Village (currently about 12,000 residents). The streets are named after the different colored lanterns, street of the Violet Lantern, Blue Lantern, etc. (colored lanterns were used by ships 200 years ago to advertise their fares when pulled into the Dana Point natural harbor).[citation needed] His crowning structure was to be the Dana Point Inn, a Mediterranean-like resort hotel. After a celebratory groundbreaking in 1930, a three-story foundation was poured and a 135-foot (41 m) elevator shaft was dug. However, the Great Depression caused construction to halt. Although Woodruff continuously sought financial support through the years, this project was abandoned in 1939. Subsequently, he sold the remaining holdings of the Dana Point Syndicate. Thirty-four of the original Woodruff residences are still occupied.

Dana Point Harbor

Dana Point Harbor

The Harbor is home to a Marina, shops and restaurants and is a point of departure for the Catalina Express, a transportation service to and from the City of Avalon on Catalina Island. The entire harbor of Dana Point, including the Embarcadero Marina shops and restaurants are set for complete demolition and redevelopment. The current vintage nautical style is being abandoned for a Tech Minimalist concept utilizing metal roofs as well as Minimalist landscaping.[6]

Capistrano Beach

Capistrano Beach Dana Point California

In 1928, a corporate entity of the American industrial giant Edward Doheny, who had built his fortune in oil production in Southern California and Mexico, purchased a number of lots in Capistrano Beach. Doheny’s son, Ned, formed a development company, the Capistrano Beach Company, which included his wife’s twin brothers, Clark and Warren Smith and Luther Eldridge, a contractor, to build a community of Spanish style houses. According to Dana Point historians Baum and Burnes,* Eldridge favored two dominant characteristics in his homes, a typically Spanish roof line and the use of large ceiling beams in the houses’ main rooms. The roofline, covered with red ceramic tiles, incorporated a low-pitched gable, spreading out to one short and one long roof. The ceiling beams were stenciled artwork painted by artist Alex Meston. Eldridge was able to complete the original Doheny family house on the bluffs, four houses on the beach, and 18 other homes scattered throughout the area before tragedy struck the ambitious project. Edward Doheny was preparing for his criminal trial for bribery in the Teapot Dome Scandal, and on February 16, 1929, Ned Doheny and, Hugh Plunkett, his friend and secretary, who were to testify in the trial, were killed in a murder that still remains unsolved. In 1931, as a memorial to Ned, Petroleum Securities Company, Doheny’s family-owned business, made a gift of 41.4 acres (168,000 m2) to the State of California, which is now Doheny State Park. The unimproved Capistrano Beach properties passed back to Edward Doheny, and, upon his death in 1935, to his wife and heirs. By 1944, all of the properties had been sold to private parties.

The Doheny family also funded the building of the what was then called St. Edward’s Chapel in Capistrano Beach. The Chapel soon grew, received canonical status as a parish, and moved to its current bluff-top location in Dana Point, overlooking Doheny State Beach.

Surfing

Dana considered the high bluffs and sheltered coves of this area of Southern California to be the most beautiful spot on the California coast. Pioneering surfers agreed, as they surfed the many beach breaks along the coast. Dana Point had a notable surfing history, and was home to many of the first companies that produced products for surfing. Hobie Alter opened one of the first retail surf shops in Dana Point in 1954. Many surf publications such as the Surfer’s Journal and Surfer Magazine were formed and headquartered in Dana Point. Bruce Brown produced the surfer film Endless Summer in Dana Point.

“Killer Dana” was a legendary surf break off Dana Point. The surf break was notorious because it came out of deep water and broke close to the rocks that lined the beach. The Killer Dana wave was destroyed when the Dana Point Harbor was built in 1966.[7] A breakwater now cuts right through the heart of the once epic surf spot. In 1997, the surf group The Chantays recorded an instrumental track named “Killer Dana”.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.5 square miles (76 km2). 6.5 square miles (17 km2) of it is land and 23.0 square miles (60 km2) of it (77.96%) is water.

Dana Point harbor as seen from the end of Blue Lantern St.

The Dana Point headlands are a prominent feature in Orange County geography and after years of controversy,[8] are currently being developed as a 118-house gated community.

However 68 acres (280,000 m2) of the site is open to the public and features a nature center and walking trails exhibiting “lost” plants of the Southern California coast. Views on a clear day extend to Catalina Island and La Jolla in San Diego county. link Dana Point Headlands

Dana Point Beach, CA in the winter

Climate

Dana Point enjoys a mild climate where temperatures tend to average around the 70′s. The warmest month of the year is August with an average temperature of 79 °F (26 °C). The coldest month is December with an average minimum temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit.[citation needed]

Marine life

One of the very few known specimens of the megamouth shark was caught off Dana Point in 1990.[citation needed] Visitors can visit the tide pools located just north of Dana Point Harbor for a view of marine life during low tide. With the kelp beds located just offshore, Dana Point in a popular destination for snorkelers, fisherman and spear fishers.

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[9] reported that Dana Point had a population of 33,351. The population density was 1,131.1 people per square mile (436.7/km²). The racial makeup of Dana Point was 28,701 (86.1%) White (76.4% Non-Hispanic White),[10] 294 (0.9%) African American, 229 (0.7%) Native American, 1,064 (3.2%) Asian, 37 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 1,952 (5.9%) from other races, and 1,074 (3.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5,662 persons (17.0%).

The Census reported that 33,110 people (99.3% of the population) lived in households, 160 (0.5%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 81 (0.2%) were institutionalized.

There were 14,182 households, out of which 3,459 (24.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 6,902 (48.7%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,232 (8.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, 645 (4.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 780 (5.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 137 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 4,012 households (28.3%) were made up of individuals and 1,406 (9.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33. There were 8,779 families (61.9% of all households); the average family size was 2.85.

The population was spread out with 5,959 people (17.9%) under the age of 18, 2,522 people (7.6%) aged 18 to 24, 8,261 people (24.8%) aged 25 to 44, 10,927 people (32.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 5,682 people (17.0%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.8 years. For every 100 females there were 98.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.9 males.

There were 15,938 housing units at an average density of 540.6 per square mile (208.7/km²), of which 8,314 (58.6%) were owner-occupied, and 5,868 (41.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.0%; the rental vacancy rate was 7.0%. 19,419 people (58.2% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 13,691 people (41.1%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Dana Point had a median household income of $80,938, with 8.4% of the population living below the federal poverty line. [11]

2000

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 35,110 people, 14,456 households, and 9,280 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,290.1 inhabitants per square mile (2,041.6/km²). There were 15,682 housing units at an average density of 2,362.8 per square mile (911.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.25% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.57% Native American, 2.52% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 5.92% from other races, and 2.81% from two or more races. 15.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 14,456 households out of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $63,043, and the median income for a family was $73,373 (these figures had risen to $81,665 and $97,826 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[13]). Males had a median income of $52,159 versus $38,902 for females. The per capita income for the city was $37,938. About 3.4% of families and 6.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

In 2010 Dana Point had a population of 33,351. The median age was 44.8 years. The racial and ethnic composition of the population was 76.4% non-Hispanic white, 0.9% black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 3.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.2% non-Hispanic of some other race, 3.2% reporting two or more races and 17.0% Hispanic or Latino. Mexicans made up 13.2% of the population.[14]

Alternative view of the Dana Point harbor.

Annual cultural events

Dana Point has held a Festival of Whales since 1972. This celebration is held over two weekends in March.[15]

The Tall Ships Festival is held in September. It is considered the largest annual gathering of its kind on the West Coast of the United States.[16]

Dana Point has hosted the Dana Point Concours d’Elegance since 2008. The event is located on the Monarch Beach Golf Links and supports various charities.

The Dana Point Grand Prix is an annual criterium bike race overlooking Dana Point Harbor. The course winds its way through downtown Dana Point into Heritage Park and the adjoining residential community with ocean views for participants and spectators before finishing on a long straightaway on PCH. [1]

The Dana Point Chamber of Commerce hosts the annual Turkey Trot, which includes a 5K, 10K and Kids’ Gobble Wobble race for ages 5–12, which was voted as a top destination for Thanksgiving by Fodor’s Magazine. This event attracts over 10,000 runners throughout the country and another 5,000 family and friends.

Government

In the state legislature Dana Point is located in the 35th Senate District, represented by Republican Tom Harman, and in the 73rd Assembly District, represented by Republican Diane Harkey. Federally, Dana Point is located in California’s 49th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +8[17] and is represented by Republican Darrell Issa.

Education

The city is served by Capistrano Unified School District. It includes Dana Hills High School, one of the oldest high schools in the area which opened in 1972.The Cross Country program at Dana Hills High School won California state titles in 1988, 2007, 2008, and 2009.

Emergency services

Fire protection in Dana Point is provided by the Orange County Fire Authority with ambulance service by Doctor’s Ambulance. Law enforcement is provided by the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. Year round marine safety services are provided by (U.S. Ocean Safety Lifeguards) now called OC Lifeguards on the beautiful county beaches and California State Lifeguards on the other state beaches.

Media

Dana Point is served by two newspapers, the Dana Point News (owned by the Orange County Register) and the Dana Point Times. Both papers run once weekly.

The Laguna Niguel-Dana Point Patch is an online only news website that also serves Dana Point along with its neighbor Laguna Niguel.

References

  1. ^ “California Cities by Incorporation Date” (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ “City Council”. Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  3. ^ U.S. Census
  4. ^ a b c “Dana Point”. Office of Historic Preservation, California State Parks. Retrieved 2012-10-11. 
  5. ^ Dana, Jr., Richard Henry (1912). Two Years Before the Mast. D. Appleton. p. 147. Retrieved July 1, 2010. 
  6. ^ Dana Point Harbor official website. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  7. ^ “A history of Killer Dana”. 
  8. ^ http://www.surfingthemag.com/news/surfing-pulse/strands-061305-dana-point/[dead link] surfingthemag.com
  9. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  10. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0617946.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0617946.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12. ^ “American FactFinder”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ American FactFinder
  14. ^ Census General Population and Housing Characteristics report for Dana Point, 2010
  15. ^ Daines, Chris (March 3, 2009). “Festival of Whales coasts into Dana Point”. The Orange County Register. Retrieved March 6, 2009. 
  16. ^ “Tall Ships Festival”. The Orange County Register. September 5, 2008. pp. Show 1. 
  17. ^ “Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?”. Campaign Legal Center Blog. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 

External links

External images
Photo of Dana Point before the boat harbor

Archival collections

Other



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Dana Point, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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See also



This article uses material from the Wikipedia article East Lake, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 
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